Lydia runs Manta Watch NZ

Lydia runs Manta Watch NZ

A new project being supported by YFS. Lydia runs Manta Watch NZ is an experienced marine ecologist and has worked with Manta rays since 2013. Watch more here. The biggest challenge for Manta Watch is consistent and quality time out in the field. The smaller vessels they use are heavily governed by weather, drastically reducing their time to data collect and tag. Larger vessels that can remain ‘on-station’ with better facilities onboard. This is where yachts for science is helping find Lydia and her team larger boats.

The bulk of the research is carried out between December and March, this is when the oceanic manta rays are most prolific in the Haruaki gulf and Northern NE cost of NZ North Island, from North Cape to East Cape. Would a project like this be of interest? Please contact Rosie@yachtsforscience.com for more information.

A direct relationship between healthy seabird populations on islands and healthy reefs

Coconut Crab East Island

In 2018 scientists discovered a direct relationship between healthy seabird populations on islands and healthy reefs. Seabirds forage for food in the ocean they return to the islands and their droppings act as a natural fertiliser for the surrounding corals. Seabird densities and nitrogen deposition rates are 760 and 251 times higher, respectively, on islands where humans have not introduced rats. On rat-free islands, fish biomass and coral reef productivity is higher, with evidence that this may also provide some resilience to coral bleaching. Save Eagle Island is the Chagos Conservation Trust’s ambitious project that aims to ecologically restore the Chagos Archipelago’s second largest island and see the return of thriving seabird populations, and remove the rats. Yachts for Science is working together with Chagos Conservation trust finding yachts interested in supporting this project.

The Maldives is home to the world’s largest population of reef manta rays

Explorer Yachts Summit 2022

The Maldives is home to the world’s largest population of reef manta rays. However recently, a significant population of their larger cousins; the oceanic manta rays have been uncovered. Worryingly, this area is in close proximity to one of the world’s main oceanic manta fisheries in neighbouring Sri Lanka. Tens of thousands are killed every year for their gill plates. 800 manta rays have been identified, however, there are still many unknowns and continued observations are needed to confirm the timing and drivers of their movements. Yachts for Science is looking for vessels in the Maldives to take Simon and his team April – May 2023 for 10 days.

On November 10th join Yachts For Science at this year’s Explorer Yacht Summit

Explorer Yachts Summit 2022

On November 10th join Yachts For Science at this year’s Explorer Yacht Summit in Monaco and discover new science projects. You will meet the world’s leading experts for a day of discussion and networking. Topics covered: The state of the explorer market. Ground-breaking projects. What will explorer yachts of the future look like? The latest design trends. The rise of the support vessel. Owner insight: Victor Vescovo on his underwater adventures. The growth of the adventure charter market. The philanthropic adventures of the 60-metre Seahawk.
Tickets available here.

Are you crossing the Atlantic this autumn Gilbrater to Caribbean?

Yachts for Science

Are you crossing the Atlantic this autumn Gilbrater to Caribbean? Meet Rebecca Rae Helm from GO Sea Science research funded by NASA. Rebecca is looking for with MY or SY crossing the Atlantic this year that would be interested in getting involved in a citizen project – Deploying Neuston nets at sea, towing a net once a day and recording the findings. The vessel should configure its towing set-up to ensure the net remains out of the stern wake turbulence and along-hull slipstream in order to get comparable and accurate surface plankton/plastic samples. This work will help her study the ocean’s surface which, paradoxically, is one of the most understudied habitats on earth. And because it also involves plastic pollution, her research will help us understand how plastic is impacting surface life. Please contact Rosie@yachtsforscience.com for more information.

Yachts For Science are currently supporting Basecamp Research Water Sampling

Richard Stokes

Yachts For Science are currently supporting Basecamp Research Water Sampling. Shown here, Emma Bolton is using a portable lab to carry out water / marine sediment sampling, whilst vessels are doing sea trials or during deliveries. This vital DNA research has minimal impact to the vessels private programme or charters. The portable lab allows Basecamp to filter water and extract the DNA from water and marine sediment in the sampling locations the vessel is working in. This allows for analysis of biodiversity of the marine environment, providing insights which are made publicly available for diversity studies world-wide.

Yachts For Science matched Dr Kristen Brown to MY No Limit

Richard Stokes

Earlier this year Yachts For Science matched Dr Kristen Brown to MY No Limit a 90ft privately owned exploration in Hawaii. In Aug/ Sept this year, she will be joining the vessel to carry out vital research. Kristen is a coral reef ecologist who researches the effects of global change on coral reef ecosystems. Her research aims to better understand physiological and ecological changes to individual organisms, species interactions, and coral reef ecosystems under global change. Specifically, her current research focuses on acidification resilience and if corals native to habitats with extreme daily changes in pH are better suited to survive under acidification stress.

Yachts For Science are looking for a yacht for Manta Biologist, Luke Gordon

UKSA - Did you know?

Yachts For Science are looking for a yacht for Manta Biologist, Luke Gordon. Project Summary, to investigate the movement ecology, population demographics and site fidelity of Fiji’s Manta Ray population through exploration and citizen science within the Lau Group.
Location: Lau Group, Fiji
Berths: Minimum of two
Duration: July, August, ONGOING, 1-2 weeks
Necessary equipment: Drone, Underwater Camera, Snorkel Equipment, would be a huge benefit to have SCUBA

If you can help please get in touch.

Yachts For Science

UKSA women undertaking their Superyacht Cadetship

Yachts For Science is currently assisting Dr Brown with her latest research project in Eastern Oahu, Hawaii. Dr Brown is investigating if climate-proof corals exist within extreme environments that already experience temperature and pH conditions projected for future reefs. Specifically, her current research focuses on acidification resilience and if corals native to habitats with extreme daily changes in pH are better suited to survive under acidification stress. Click here to learn more.

 

Yachts for Science

UKSA women undertaking their Superyacht Cadetship

The latest funding provided by Ocean Family Foundation will allow Yachts for Science to continue their invaluable work matching private yachts with marine scientists. Founded by a team of marine biologists, environmental researchers and media documentaries, YFS recognised that thousands of yachts were left at anchor, whilst hundreds of marine biologists are desperate for access to the sea. By creating a simple matchmaking platform, YFS can facilitate thousands of pounds worth of research utilising available assets. This April Mantra Trust has access to a private vessel in the Maldives for a week.