We fund and actively support a variety of sustainable marine conservation programmes.

Our aim is that the rich biodiversity of the world’s largest and most important wilderness, the ocean, may be protected and thrive for generations to come.

“The ocean’s power of regeneration is remarkable
– if we just offer it the chance.”


– Sir David Attenborough

We fund and actively support a variety of sustainable marine conservation programmes.

Our aim is that the rich biodiversity of the world’s largest and most important wilderness, the ocean, may be protected and thrive for generations to come.

“The ocean’s power of regeneration is remarkable
– if we just offer it the chance.”


– Sir David Attenborough

WHO

WHAT

PROGRAMMES

Oceans Family Foundation are proud to support these programmes

Oceans Without Borders thumbnail - ocean image

OCEANS WITHOUT
BORDERS

&Beyond’s Oceans Without Borders initiative, in partnership with Africa Foundation, expands their longstanding dedication to land and wildlife conservation to include the much needed protection and preservation of our oceans.

Plastic Free

A PLASTIC
PLANET

A Plastic Planet is a goal campaign organisation . It was founded to ignite and inspire the world to turn off the plastic tap. We want to dramatically REDUCE the use of indestructible plastic that is destroying our oceans, our soils, our air and the health of future generations.

Worldrise thumbnail image on beach

WORLDRISE

Worldrise is a non-profit organisation founded by young professionals able to create projects that unite environmental protection, creativity, and education.

CONNECT

SAVE THE MED 🐢 

Capturing the release of rehabilitated loggerhead turtles. These reptiles are under enormous pressure from drifting fishing nets and miscellaneous plastic waste found in our seas. 

👀 @savethemedexpeditions to find out more. 🎥 @sharkman_dan 

@savethemed #oceanfamilyfoundation

SAVE THE MED 🐢

Capturing the release of rehabilitated loggerhead turtles. These reptiles are under enormous pressure from drifting fishing nets and miscellaneous plastic waste found in our seas.

👀 @savethemedexpeditions to find out more. 🎥 @sharkman_dan

@savethemed #oceanfamilyfoundation
...

@natural_history_museum 'Our Broken Planet: How We Got Here and Ways to Fix It' has something for visitors of all ages.

The free exhibit is made up of three sections: Eating the Earth; Nature for Sale; and Climate Emergency. The sections were each revealed one at a time and put together to offer an informative yet comprehensible commentary of humans' impact on our climate and 'some solutions that could mend our broken planet'. 

The 'Eating the Earth' section shows the impact of Westerners' general food choices on the planet - spoiler alert, not good. Using bright infographics, this section compares the impact that different food has on the environment. For example, did you know that it takes 326.2 square metres to produce 1 kg of beef, and only 3.5 square metres to produce the same quantity of tofu? This section also explores the possibility of lab-grown meat, a recent endeavour rapidly gaining traction within many scientific fields. To engage the youngest of minds, this section also offers bright interactive - well, can't spoil it all, can I?

The next section, 'Nature for Sale' explores how the resources that make up everyday items can affect the climate. To the majority of us who don't consider the effect our fashion choices or latest devices can have on the Earth, the alarming statistics are a shocking wake-up call. We can see from this section the necessity of understanding that the resources our planet offers are finite and must be conserved. 

The final and latest section, 'Climate Emergency' investigates the effect of climate change on our natural world. It confronts the startling reality of dangerous wildfires blazing across the world and the bleak future of our coral reefs. 

The exhibit will be open until the summer of 2022.

#oceanfamilyfoundation

@natural_history_museum 'Our Broken Planet: How We Got Here and Ways to Fix It' has something for visitors of all ages.

The free exhibit is made up of three sections: Eating the Earth; Nature for Sale; and Climate Emergency. The sections were each revealed one at a time and put together to offer an informative yet comprehensible commentary of humans' impact on our climate and 'some solutions that could mend our broken planet'.

The 'Eating the Earth' section shows the impact of Westerners' general food choices on the planet - spoiler alert, not good. Using bright infographics, this section compares the impact that different food has on the environment. For example, did you know that it takes 326.2 square metres to produce 1 kg of beef, and only 3.5 square metres to produce the same quantity of tofu? This section also explores the possibility of lab-grown meat, a recent endeavour rapidly gaining traction within many scientific fields. To engage the youngest of minds, this section also offers bright interactive - well, can't spoil it all, can I?

The next section, 'Nature for Sale' explores how the resources that make up everyday items can affect the climate. To the majority of us who don't consider the effect our fashion choices or latest devices can have on the Earth, the alarming statistics are a shocking wake-up call. We can see from this section the necessity of understanding that the resources our planet offers are finite and must be conserved.

The final and latest section, 'Climate Emergency' investigates the effect of climate change on our natural world. It confronts the startling reality of dangerous wildfires blazing across the world and the bleak future of our coral reefs.

The exhibit will be open until the summer of 2022.

#oceanfamilyfoundation
...

HAPPY NEW YEAR 🥳 

New adventures are around the corner. Happy New Year! #oceanfamilyfoundation

HAPPY NEW YEAR 🥳

New adventures are around the corner. Happy New Year! #oceanfamilyfoundation
...

HUMPBACK 🐋 

‘Tis the season for family time. #oceanfamilyfoundation

HUMPBACK 🐋

‘Tis the season for family time. #oceanfamilyfoundation
...

SEA TURTLES 🐢 

Sea turtles are an iconic species and an indicator of the health of our oceans and beaches. They are highly mobile and travel vast distances, which makes conservation strategies inherently challenging.

Sea turtle nesting in 🇿🇦 occurs from November - March. @oceanswithoutborders invest time in understanding nesting habits and movement patterns so they can help protect this wonderful species for years to come. #oceanswithoutborders #oceanfamilyfoundation

SEA TURTLES 🐢

Sea turtles are an iconic species and an indicator of the health of our oceans and beaches. They are highly mobile and travel vast distances, which makes conservation strategies inherently challenging.

Sea turtle nesting in 🇿🇦 occurs from November - March. @oceanswithoutborders invest time in understanding nesting habits and movement patterns so they can help protect this wonderful species for years to come. #oceanswithoutborders #oceanfamilyfoundation
...

UKSA ⛵️ 

@uksasailing has launched a new video which highlights the rich and varied experiences on offer for children and young people at its Cowes campus on the Isle of Wight. 

The video aims to inspire and attract donations to enable more children and young people from across the UK, who wouldn't otherwise be able to afford it, to benefit from their watersports activities programmes and educational initiatives. These enable them to build confidence, broaden their horizons and develop life skills. The charity will help a further 45,000 beneficiaries by 2025. 

📺 here: https://uksa.org/uksa-strategy/
#UKSA #oceanfamilyfoundation

UKSA ⛵️

@uksasailing has launched a new video which highlights the rich and varied experiences on offer for children and young people at its Cowes campus on the Isle of Wight.

The video aims to inspire and attract donations to enable more children and young people from across the UK, who wouldn't otherwise be able to afford it, to benefit from their watersports activities programmes and educational initiatives. These enable them to build confidence, broaden their horizons and develop life skills. The charity will help a further 45,000 beneficiaries by 2025.

📺 here: https://uksa.org/uksa-strategy/
#UKSA #oceanfamilyfoundation
...

WORLDRISE 🌎 

November has been a month of important recognition for the commitment of  @worldrise_onlus in safeguarding our ocean.

Marine biologist Mariasole Bianco, president and co-founder of Worldrise, participated in 'The economy of the future' and the 'National Geographic Fest', events highlighting sustainable development, climate change, and the importance of MPA's. Mariasole has also been awarded with the 'Special Mention for Sustainable Development' by the European Commission, as part of the GammaDonna award for innovative female entrepreneurship. #worldrise #oceanfamilyfoundation

WORLDRISE 🌎

November has been a month of important recognition for the commitment of @worldrise_onlus in safeguarding our ocean.

Marine biologist Mariasole Bianco, president and co-founder of Worldrise, participated in 'The economy of the future' and the 'National Geographic Fest', events highlighting sustainable development, climate change, and the importance of MPA's. Mariasole has also been awarded with the 'Special Mention for Sustainable Development' by the European Commission, as part of the GammaDonna award for innovative female entrepreneurship. #worldrise #oceanfamilyfoundation
...

CORAL 🆘 

Look at these little underwater trees! @oceanswithoutborders Coral Gardens are slowly growing. 

Well done to the @oceanswithoutborders and @marinecultures teams for leaving our world in a better place.
#oceanfamilyfoundation

CORAL 🆘

Look at these little underwater trees! @oceanswithoutborders Coral Gardens are slowly growing.

Well done to the @oceanswithoutborders and @marinecultures teams for leaving our world in a better place.
#oceanfamilyfoundation
...

SAVE THE MED 🦈 

Sharks are key to healthy and balanced ecosystems. To protect them, the @savethemed Foundation participates in the collaborative project “Stellaris Action” which aims to help recover the Balearic populations of the small, threatened Nursehound shark through a breeding and release programme which is combined with educational components and run in collaboration with the local government, rescue center, conservation organisations and fishermen.

The first fifteen sharks have now been hatched (⬆️) and further egg hatching continues under the supervision of marine biologists. #savethemed #oceanfamilyfoundation

SAVE THE MED 🦈

Sharks are key to healthy and balanced ecosystems. To protect them, the @savethemed Foundation participates in the collaborative project “Stellaris Action” which aims to help recover the Balearic populations of the small, threatened Nursehound shark through a breeding and release programme which is combined with educational components and run in collaboration with the local government, rescue center, conservation organisations and fishermen.

The first fifteen sharks have now been hatched (⬆️) and further egg hatching continues under the supervision of marine biologists. #savethemed #oceanfamilyfoundation
...

SEAGRASS 🌾

Seagrass sequestration of carbon is 35 faster than the rainforest. It draws carbon dioxide from the water as part of photosynthesis, and traps it in the mud.

Britain has very little rainforest to soak up carbon dioxide emissions but it does have roughly 11,000 miles (17,700km) of coastline, dotted with salt marshes and seagrass. Both habitats, alongside tropical mangroves, are the best understood stores of “blue carbon” – the carbon held in marine ecosystems (as opposed to the “green carbon” of terrestrial habitats).

These blue carbon ecosystems sequester up to 2% of the UK’s carbon emissions a year, mostly in soil and, if undisturbed, can store it for millennia. In Scotland, blue carbon stores sequester 28.4 MtCO2e (tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent) a year, about three times more than Scotland’s forests combined.

But while rainforests, peatlands and other habitats on land are well known for their importance in the climate crisis, coastal wetlands remain overlooked. 

Large-scale Seagrass restoration plays an important part in the complex jigsaw to fight climate change. #oceanfamilyfoundation #seagrass

SEAGRASS 🌾

Seagrass sequestration of carbon is 35 faster than the rainforest. It draws carbon dioxide from the water as part of photosynthesis, and traps it in the mud.

Britain has very little rainforest to soak up carbon dioxide emissions but it does have roughly 11,000 miles (17,700km) of coastline, dotted with salt marshes and seagrass. Both habitats, alongside tropical mangroves, are the best understood stores of “blue carbon” – the carbon held in marine ecosystems (as opposed to the “green carbon” of terrestrial habitats).

These blue carbon ecosystems sequester up to 2% of the UK’s carbon emissions a year, mostly in soil and, if undisturbed, can store it for millennia. In Scotland, blue carbon stores sequester 28.4 MtCO2e (tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent) a year, about three times more than Scotland’s forests combined.

But while rainforests, peatlands and other habitats on land are well known for their importance in the climate crisis, coastal wetlands remain overlooked.

Large-scale Seagrass restoration plays an important part in the complex jigsaw to fight climate change. #oceanfamilyfoundation #seagrass
...

PPE WASTE 😷 

The world generated a staggering amount of plastic waste during the pandemic, made up mainly of single-use PPEs, masks and other Covid-related medical products, according to a recent study.

The study estimated that 8.4 million tonnes of Covid-related plastic waste were generated from 193 countries as of August. Of this, 25,000 tonnes are released into oceans, making up about 1.5 per cent of the total global riverine plastic discharge.

The mismanaged plastic waste generated from individual PPE (including face masks, gloves and face shields) can be transported over long distances in the ocean, encounter marine wildlife, and potentially lead to injury or even death.

At the end of this century, the model suggests that almost all the pandemic-associated plastics end up in either the seabed (28.8 per cent) or beaches (70.5 per cent), potentially hurting the benthic ecosystems.

Another study published in January had suggested that an estimated 1.56 million face masks entered the oceans in 2020.

Disposing of PPE properly is crucial. #oceanfamilyfoundation

PPE WASTE 😷

The world generated a staggering amount of plastic waste during the pandemic, made up mainly of single-use PPEs, masks and other Covid-related medical products, according to a recent study.

The study estimated that 8.4 million tonnes of Covid-related plastic waste were generated from 193 countries as of August. Of this, 25,000 tonnes are released into oceans, making up about 1.5 per cent of the total global riverine plastic discharge.

The mismanaged plastic waste generated from individual PPE (including face masks, gloves and face shields) can be transported over long distances in the ocean, encounter marine wildlife, and potentially lead to injury or even death.

At the end of this century, the model suggests that almost all the pandemic-associated plastics end up in either the seabed (28.8 per cent) or beaches (70.5 per cent), potentially hurting the benthic ecosystems.

Another study published in January had suggested that an estimated 1.56 million face masks entered the oceans in 2020.

Disposing of PPE properly is crucial. #oceanfamilyfoundation
...

Ocean Family Foundation is a registered charity in England & Wales (1174759).
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